Discrimination

  • June 25, 2024

    Judge Says ADA Protects Gender Dysphoria In Trans Bias Suit

    A federal judge said two Arizona lawmakers can't toss a suit aiming to block a state law banning transgender girls from participating in girls' school sports, ruling gender dysphoria is protected under the Americans with Disabilities Act to keep their disability bias claims in play.

  • June 25, 2024

    6th Circ. Won't Bless More Relief For Fired FCA Worker

    A former Fiat Chrysler Automobiles employee who scored a $148,000 arbitration award on claims that he was wrongly fired for taking approved time off can't get more damages or reinstatement to the exact position he once held, the Sixth Circuit ruled.

  • June 25, 2024

    9th Circ. Won't Revive Ex-County Worker's Race Bias Suit

    The Ninth Circuit backed a Nevada county's defeat of a Black former juvenile probation officer's lawsuit claiming he was fired because he'd previously filed a discrimination suit against the county, saying Tuesday rumors and a supervisor's rude attitude weren't enough to sustain his bias allegations.

  • June 25, 2024

    EEOC Backs Fired Worker's Pregnancy Bias Suit At 4th Circ.

    The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission urged the Fourth Circuit to reinstate a hospital worker's suit claiming she was fired for requesting a reprieve from 12-hour workdays to manage her high-risk pregnancy, arguing the lower court used incorrect legal standards to toss her case.

  • June 25, 2024

    Attys Looking To States For Movement On AI Bias

    With an upcoming presidential election casting a long shadow over Capitol Hill, discrimination lawyers following the regulation of artificial intelligence in the workplace should keep a close eye on the states in the second half of 2024. Here are three things management-side lawyers say they'll be monitoring.

  • June 25, 2024

    United Strikes Deal To Exit Bias Suit Over Mask Policy

    United Airlines told a California federal court it reached a deal with a baggage handler to end his lawsuit after the Ninth Circuit determined a jury should hear his claims that the company unlawfully refused to let him wear a face shield in lieu of a mask during the COVID-19 pandemic.

  • June 25, 2024

    CEO Claims She Was Pushed Out, Told To Focus On Family

    The former chief executive officer of a petroleum distributor said in a complaint filed Monday that she was forced out of her position and replaced by a man after her mother, the board chair, told her to focus on spending time with her family.

  • June 25, 2024

    Pipefitters Union Wants Out Of Black Worker's Race Bias Suit

    A pipefitters union local asked a Pennsylvania federal judge to dismiss a member's $10 million racial bias lawsuit, saying the worker's employer, not the union, bears responsibility for any racism he experienced on the job.

  • June 25, 2024

    NJ Says Union Skipped Over Black Workers For Job Referrals

    An ironworkers union passed over workers for job assignments solely because they were Black and looked the other way when workers complained they were subjected to racist, sexist and homophobic harassment, the state of New Jersey told a state court.

  • June 25, 2024

    Co. Denies Deaf Worker's Interpreter Requests, EEOC Says

    Security company GardaWorld refused to provide a deaf employee with a sign language interpreter after it took over a Florida bank location despite the worker's multiple requests, the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission told a federal court.

  • June 25, 2024

    Wynn Casino Can't Undo Rehiring Of Worker Fired For Slur

    Wynn Resort's Encore Boston Harbor Casino has lost its effort to overturn an arbitrator's decision to reinstate and issue back pay to a call center reservation worker it fired for allegedly calling a Black colleague a racial slur.

  • June 25, 2024

    Ex-DuPont Workers' Age Bias Suit Cleared For Trial

    A Louisiana federal judge refused to grant a win to DuPont in two former employees' suit alleging they were fired because they were in their 40s and 50s, saying a jury should determine whether age bias or safety violations caused their terminations.

  • June 24, 2024

    Robust Pay Equity Clauses Grab Spotlight In $15M Snap Deal

    A $15 million settlement that Snapchat parent Snap Inc. struck with California's civil rights watchdog to resolve sex bias allegations includes cutting-edge provisions that could foreshadow future trends in pay equity laws, experts said.

  • June 24, 2024

    Split 4th Circ. Panel Reopens DEA Applicant's Retaliation Suit

    The Fourth Circuit reinstated a lawsuit Monday accusing the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration of pulling a job offer after it learned the applicant had participated in a sexual harassment suit against the FBI, saying a trial court held the would-be special agent to too high of a standard.

  • June 24, 2024

    Radio Host Says Politics Behind 'All Lives Matter' Tweet Firing

    A former radio announcer for the Sacramento Kings is forging ahead with his wrongful termination suit in California federal court, emphasizing that broadcaster Bonneville International Corp.'s decision to fire him after he tweeted "All Lives Matter" following the 2020 murder of George Floyd was politically motivated.

  • June 24, 2024

    Health Co. Narrows Doctor's Reneged Benefits Suit

    An Arizona federal judge trimmed a doctor's suit claiming her healthcare system employer refused to let her use her benefits to take time off to undergo cancer treatments, but kept alive claims that the company violated state and federal law by misleading her about paid leave.

  • June 24, 2024

    6th Circ. Backs University's Win In ADA Bias, Retaliation Suit

    The Sixth Circuit refused Monday to revive a former Western Michigan University employee's lawsuit claiming he was fired for requesting accommodations for his attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, ruling Congress didn't have the power to eliminate states' immunity from retaliation claims under federal disability law.

  • June 24, 2024

    8th Circ. Sides With Minn. DOT In Injured Worker's ADA Suit

    The Eighth Circuit on Monday backed the Minnesota Department of Transportation in a suit by a former mechanic who alleged the agency discriminated against him after an on-the-job injury, finding MNDOT reasonably showed that he could not do the work of his prior position.

  • June 24, 2024

    9th Circ. Won't Revive Ex-Uber Driver's Bias Suit

    An Asian man who previously drove for Uber didn't provide enough information in his proposed class action to support his claim that the ride-hailing platform's use of customer ratings when making decisions to drop drivers had a "significant disparate impact" on non-white drivers, the Ninth Circuit said Monday.

  • June 24, 2024

    Ex-EEOC Top Cop Backs Vax Religious Bias Suit At 4th Circ.

    A former general counsel of the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission urged the Fourth Circuit to revive a nurse's suit claiming she was fired from a Virginia health system for refusing the COVID-19 vaccine due to her Christian beliefs, arguing a lower court misinterpreted federal civil rights law.

  • June 24, 2024

    EEOC Approves US Marshals' $15M Deal In Race Bias Case

    The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission gave final approval to a $15 million settlement resolving claims that the U.S. Marshals Service systematically discriminated against hundreds of Black employees who sought promotions or special assignments, class representatives said Monday, ending the decades-old race bias case.

  • June 24, 2024

    Ex-NJ Corrections Official Can't Revive Demotion Bias Suit

    A New Jersey state appellate court on Monday refused to reinstate a lawsuit against the state's Department of Corrections alleging it demoted a former deputy commissioner because she was in her 60s and underwent a hip replacement, saying the agency's commissioner was free to make personnel decisions.

  • June 24, 2024

    Seyfarth Atty Dropped From Yeshiva U. Rape Cover-Up Suit

    A female Yeshiva University student who claims she was raped by a player on the men's basketball team, then sued the school claiming it conspired on a cover-up with Seyfarth Shaw LLP, has voluntarily dismissed two Yeshiva officials and a Seyfarth attorney from the lawsuit.

  • June 24, 2024

    IT Co. Settles Fired Worker's Anxiety Leave Retaliation Suit

    An information technology company has agreed to settle a former worker's suit claiming the company pushed him out of a job after he took medical leave to treat his anxiety that developed from working 16-hour days, according to a Florida federal court filing.

  • June 24, 2024

    GOP States Can't Freeze PWFA Regs During 8th Circ. Appeal

    A coalition of Republican attorneys general can't pause implementation of the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission's fresh Pregnant Workers Fairness Act regulations while they appeal the dismissal of their suit, an Arkansas federal judge ruled, saying the states hadn't presented any new arguments to justify the respite.

Expert Analysis

  • 5th Circ. Ruling Sets Bostock, Faith Exemption Up For Review

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    The Fifth Circuit's Braidwood v. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission decision could tee up U.S. Supreme Court review of whether employing an individual to whose protected class the employer objects infringes on the employer's religious beliefs, potentially narrowing LGBTQ worker protections from the high court's 2020 Bostock v. Clayton County decision, says Adam Grogan at Bell Law.

  • Legal Profession Gender Parity Requires Equal Parental Leave

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    To truly foster equity in the legal profession and to promote attorney retention, workplaces need to better support all parents, regardless of gender — starting by offering equal and robust parental leave to both birthing and non-birthing parents, says Ali Spindler at Irwin Fritchie.

  • Why Employers Should Refrain From 'Quiet Firing'

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    While quiet firing — when an employer deliberately makes working conditions intolerable with the goal of forcing an employee to quit — has recently been identified in the news as a new trend, such constructive discharge tactics have been around for ages, and employers would do well to remember that, comparatively, direct firings may provide more legal protection, says Robin Shea at Constangy.

  • 5 New Calif. Laws Employers Need To Know

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    Now is a good time for employers to evaluate personnel rules to keep pace with California’s newly adopted employee protections, which go into effect early next year and include laws regarding reproductive loss leave, cannabis use, workplace violence prevention and noncompete agreements, say attorneys at Farella Braun.

  • 3 Employer Strategies To Streamline Mass Arbitrations

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    Workers under arbitration agreements have gained an edge on their employers by filing floods of tedious and expensive individualized claims, but companies can adapt to this new world of mass arbitration by applying several new strategies that may streamline the dispute-resolution process, says Michael Strauss at Alternative Resolution Centers.

  • How AI 'Cultural Fit' Assessments Can Be Analyzed For Bias

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    Attorneys at Sanford Heisler explore how the use of artificial intelligence to assess workplace cultural fit may provide employees with increased opportunities to challenge biased hiring practices, and employers with more potential to mitigate against bias in algorithmic evaluations.

  • High Court's Old, Bad Stats Analysis Can Miss Discrimination

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    Courts and practitioners should reconsider a common statistical test for evidence of employment discrimination, created by the U.S. Supreme Court for its 1977 Castaneda and Hazelwood cases, because its “two or three standard deviations” criteria stems from a misunderstanding of statistical methods that can dramatically minimize the actual prevalence of discrimination, says Daniel Levy at Advanced Analytical Consulting Group.

  • Transparency And Explainability Are Critical To AI Compliance

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    Although there is not yet a comprehensive law governing artificial intelligence, regulators have tools to hold businesses accountable, and companies need to focus on ensuring that consumers and key stakeholders understand how their AI systems operate and make decisions, say Chanley Howell and Lauren Hudon at Foley & Lardner.

  • In Focus At The EEOC: Emerging And Developing Issues

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    The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission's recently finalized strategic enforcement plan highlights how the agency will prioritize its limited resources over the next four years, and the most notable emerging issues include ensuring protections for pregnant workers and those dealing with long-term COVID-19 effects, says Jim Paretti at Littler.

  • Employer Takeaways From 2nd Circ. Equal Pay Ruling

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    The Second Circuit 's recent decision in Eisenhauer v. Culinary Institute of America reversed a long-held understanding of the Equal Pay Act, ultimately making it easier for employers to defend against equal pay claims brought under federal law, but it is not a clear escape hatch for employers, say Thelma Akpan and Katelyn McCombs at Littler.

  • AI Isn't The Wild West, So Prepare Now For Bias Risks

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    In addition to President Joe Biden's recent historic executive order on safe, secure and trustworthy artificial intelligence, there are existing federal and state laws prohibiting fraud, defamation and even discrimination, so companies considering using or developing AI should take steps to minimize legal and business risks, says civil rights attorney Farhana Khera.

  • AI's Baked-In Bias: What To Watch Out For

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    The federal AI executive order is a direct acknowledgment of the perils of inherent bias in artificial intelligence systems, and highlights the need for legal professionals to thoroughly vet AI systems, including data and sources, algorithms and AI training methods, and more, say Jonathan Hummel and Jonathan Talcott at Ballard Spahr.

  • 'Miss Manners' Scenarios Holds Job Accommodation Lessons

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    Robin Shea at Constangy looks at the potentially negative legal consequences for employers who follow some advice recently given in the Washington Post's "Miss Manners" column, and offers solutions of her own.