Discrimination

  • June 12, 2024

    Robust EEOC Amicus Program Tackles AI, High Court Rulings

    The amicus briefs the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission lodged in the first six months of 2024 included a rare district court filing in a suit against a maker of artificial intelligence-powered hiring tools and appellate missives on the reach of an April U.S. Supreme Court ruling. Here’s a look at five EEOC amicus briefs that caught discrimination lawyers' attention.

  • June 12, 2024

    Solar Staffing Cos. Escape Black Workers' Race Bias Suit

    Renewable energy industry staffing companies defeated a lawsuit claiming they used the pandemic as an excuse to fire dozens of Black workers, with a Texas federal judge saying the former employees couldn't overcome the companies' explanation that the workers had violated COVID-19 safety measures.

  • June 12, 2024

    Marketing Co. Can't Sink ADA Suit Over Wellness Program

    An Illinois federal judge refused to toss a proposed class action brought by marketing firm workers who allege a medical exam for the company's wellness plan violated disability bias law, saying their argument that the test wasn't genuinely voluntary was strong enough to stay in court.

  • June 11, 2024

    Seattle Port's Ex-Police Takes Wrongful Firing Case To Trial

    A former Port of Seattle police chief told a Washington state jury on Tuesday that he was wrongfully fired from his job over false claims that he retaliated against an officer, accusing the port of hiring an independent investigator to assemble a damning report in anticipation of a lawsuit over the termination.

  • June 11, 2024

    Dem Bill Would Cancel 2018 High Court Ruling On Arbitration

    House and Senate Democrats reintroduced legislation Tuesday that would do away with mandatory workplace arbitration agreements, a move they said would counteract a 2018 U.S. Supreme Court ruling that said requiring solo arbitration in worker disputes didn't violate federal labor law.

  • June 11, 2024

    Texas, Mont. Sue HHS Over ACA Trans Discrimination Rule

    Texas and Montana filed suit against the Biden administration seeking to halt its rule clarifying the application of the Affordable Care Act's nondiscrimination protections to gender identity, saying the new regulations infringe on states' autonomy and force them to violate their own laws.

  • June 11, 2024

    Raytheon Openly Prefers Younger Job Applicants, Suit Says

    Raytheon for years has violated age bias law by advertising positions explicitly meant for recent college graduates despite public statements acknowledging that the aerospace company needs thousands of additional workers, a 67-year-old job applicant alleged Tuesday in Massachusetts federal court.

  • June 11, 2024

    4th Circ. Says Md. Development Entity Immune From Bias Suit

    The Fourth Circuit on Tuesday upheld the dismissal of a lawsuit alleging a Maryland economic development corporation fired a Black employee for complaining she'd been denied opportunities because of her race and gender, saying a lower court correctly ruled that the state organization is immune from her claims.

  • June 11, 2024

    Lacrosse Coach Loses Bias Suit After Getting Cozen Booted

    A Pennsylvania federal judge tossed a lawsuit Tuesday from a high school lacrosse coach who said her contract wasn't renewed because of gender, age and disability bias, finding the school district showed that its decision stemmed from concerns about her professionalism.

  • June 11, 2024

    Stanford Says Instructor's Firing Over Gaza Class Is Legit

    Stanford University has asked a judge to dismiss a lawsuit by a Black Muslim lecturer who said he was let go after giving a controversial talk on the Gaza war, saying it didn't dismiss him because of his race, color or religion, but because he ran a bad classroom exercise.

  • June 11, 2024

    GRSM50 Adds Labor And Employment Pro In San Diego

    Gordon Rees Scully Mansukhani LLP has hired as a partner for its employment law practice an attorney with prior private practice experience who has also worked for multiple companies and a labor union during her more than 20-year career.

  • June 11, 2024

    Ariz. Builder Settles EEOC Suit Over Late Workforce Data

    A homebuilder reached a deal with the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission to end a suit claiming it failed to hand over its workforce demographic data, marking the latest settlement in a spate of recent EEOC suits challenging reporting requirement noncompliance.

  • June 11, 2024

    Ex-Papa John's Driver's Race Harassment, Pay Suit Proceeds

    A Black former pizza delivery driver for a Papa John's franchise can pursue his claims that he faced a hostile work environment and was underreimbursed for mileage, an Alabama federal judge ruled, but the judge limited the methods the worker can use to prove his allegations.

  • June 11, 2024

    Gastropub, HR Firm Strike Deal To End EEOC Harassment Suit

    The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission said Tuesday that a Honolulu gastropub and its human resources consultant have agreed to pay $115,000 to resolve a suit accusing the companies of allowing sexual harassment to run rampant in the restaurant.

  • June 10, 2024

    Weinstein Calls Accuser 'Brazen Liar' In Calif. Criminal Appeal

    Harvey Weinstein told a California appellate court that prejudicial rulings deprived him of a fair trial in the Golden State, arguing in his opening brief that the jury wrongfully heard evidence of uncharged sex assault offenses but never heard evidence that would have exposed his accuser as a "brazen liar."

  • June 10, 2024

    EEOC Says Auto Co. Got Rid Of Harassment Suit Evidence

    The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission told a Michigan federal court Monday that an automotive services company improperly deleted crucial emails, text messages and personnel records related to claims that it fired an employee after she reported that a supervisor was pressuring her for sex.

  • June 10, 2024

    9th Circ. Won't Revive Ex-City Worker's Accommodation Suit

    The Ninth Circuit declined Monday to revive an employee's suit alleging the city he worked for used an argument he had with police officers as a cover-up to fire him because he requested leave to treat a knee injury, ruling that the worker lacked proof of prejudice.

  • June 10, 2024

    6th Circ. Backs CBP Win In Black Worker's Race Bias Suit

    The Sixth Circuit on Monday refused to reinstate a lawsuit a patrol officer brought against the U.S. Customs and Border Protection Agency alleging he was demoted because he's Black, saying no new trial is needed despite the worker's argument that the lower court wrongly excluded certain evidence.

  • June 10, 2024

    Introducing Law360's Pay Disclosure Law Tracker

    A movement to tackle discriminatory pay gaps has swept the U.S. in recent years as nearly half of states have enacted bans on salary history requests while almost a dozen have issued laws that require employers to share what they're willing to pay for a position. Law360 has created an interactive, nationwide map tracking these salary history bans and pay transparency requirements.

  • June 10, 2024

    2nd Circ. Upholds Toss Of Fired Cop's Race, Sex Bias Suit

    The Second Circuit refused Monday to revive a Black police officer's lawsuit alleging a New York town fired her after she hurt her back while allowing white men to take on light work or retire, finding she was treated the same as colleagues who weren't receiving disability benefits.

  • June 10, 2024

    Jury Says School Workers Owed $950K In COVID Bias Suit

    An Oregon federal jury said six education workers should get a combined $950,000 win in their religious bias suit claiming their school district illegally placed them on indefinite unpaid leave after approving their exemptions to its COVID-19 vaccination mandate.

  • June 10, 2024

    W.Va. Anti-Trans Sports Suit Stayed Amid High Court Bid

    A West Virginia federal judge has temporarily paused a lawsuit from a transgender minor challenging a state law that prohibits biological males from joining girls' teams, arguing it is not in the best interest of taxpayers to proceed while the U.S. Supreme Court weighs whether to take up the case.

  • June 10, 2024

    5th Circ. Upends Dallas School District Win In Age Bias Suit

    The Fifth Circuit reinstated a lawsuit from a Dallas school district worker who said she was passed over for promotions and fired because she was in her mid-50s, saying a trial court held her to too high a standard when it threw out her lawsuit.

  • June 10, 2024

    Cozen O'Connor Booted From Pa. Equal Pay Case

    Cozen O'Connor has been booted off a Pennsylvania school district's equal-pay lawsuit that was being overseen by a judge with personal ties to the firm, according to an order the judge issued Monday.

  • June 10, 2024

    FordHarrison Makes Associate Hires Across 5 Offices

    FordHarrison LLP announced that it made associate hires across five of the employment law firm's office locations including Los Angeles and Washington, D.C.

Expert Analysis

  • Insurance Implications Of High Court Affirmative Action Ruling

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    The U.S. Supreme Court's recent ruling striking down affirmative action admissions policies at Harvard University and the University of North Carolina will likely result in more litigation related to hiring practices, with implications for insurance coverage, meaning policyholders must remain wary of exclusions and other potential roadblocks, say attorneys at Pillsbury.

  • 4 Strategies To Counter Antisemitism In The Workplace

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    With antisemitism on the rise in the U.S., employers have a duty to help Jewish employees feel safe and supported in their professional lives by adapting the four points of the Biden administration's National Strategy to Counter Antisemitism for the workplace, say Johanna Zelman and Rachel Ullrich at FordHarrison.

  • Employer Steps To Protect DEI Plans Post-Affirmative Action

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    The U.S. Supreme Court’s decision to end affirmative action in higher education may embolden opponents of diversity, equity and inclusion efforts in the employment context, but employers can take steps to mitigate litigation risks while still advancing their internal policy goals, say Greg Demers and Renai Rodney at Ropes & Gray.

  • Unpacking The POWR Act, Colo.'s New Work Harassment Law

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    With the August rollout of Colorado’s Protecting Opportunities and Workers' Rights Act set to make it easier for employees to claim harassment, companies should confirm that their harassment prevention programs satisfy the law’s requirements and provide a clear method to investigate any future claims, say Mamie Ling and Michael Freimann at Armstrong Teasdale.

  • Complying With AI Guidance In Employment Decisions

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    Following the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission’s recently updated guidance on the use of artificial intelligence for employment-related decisions, employers need to adapt in kind to ensure they are using technology in a responsible, compliant and nondiscriminatory manner, say Luke Bickel and Yasamin Parsafar at Sheppard Mullin.

  • NY, Minn. Set Pace For Employee Breastfeeding Protections

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    Breastfeeding employees have gotten increased legal protections through recently effective amendments in New York and Minnesota, and the laws underline the need for employers to watch for state-level legislative efforts to extend these protections beyond federal requirements, say John Litchfield and Miranda Curtis at Foley & Lardner.

  • Bar Score Is Best Hiring Metric Post-Affirmative Action

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    After the U.S. Supreme Court's ruling striking down affirmative action admissions policies, law firms looking to foster diversity in hiring should view an applicant's Multistate Bar Examination score as the best metric of legal ability — over law school name or GPA, says attorney Alice Griffin.

  • What To Expect From High Court's Whistleblower Case

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    The U.S. Supreme Court's upcoming decision in Murray v. UBS Securities will likely have widespread implications for the future of anti-retaliation whistleblower litigation, and could make it more difficult for would-be whistleblower-employees to succeed on anti-retaliation claims under the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, say Ann-Elizabeth Ostrager and Diane McGimsey at Sullivan & Cromwell.

  • 'Equal Harassment' Is No Shield Against Title VII Claims

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    The Ninth Circuit’s decision in Sharp v. S&S Activewear, rejecting an employer's claim that it did not create a sexually hostile work environment because the misogynist music it played offended all workers equally, reminds companies that they can face Title VII liability even when misconduct does not target a specific group, says Laura Lawless at Squire Patton.

  • Recent Changes Mark A Key Moment For New York High Court

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    Recent developments in the New York Court of Appeals — from rapid turnover and increasing diversity, to a perception among some of growing politicization — mark an important turning point, and the court will continue to evolve in the coming year as it considers a number of important cases, say attorneys at Gibson Dunn.

  • How End Of Forced Arb. Is Affecting Sex Harassment Cases

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    A little over a year after the Ending Forced Arbitration of Sexual Assault Act became effective, we have started seeing substantive interpretation of the EFAA, almost exclusively from the U.S. district courts in New York, and there are two key takeaways for employers, says Lisa Haldar at Lawrence & Bundy.

  • Adjusting Anti-Harassment Policies For Remote Work

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
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    Limited employee oversight and a lack of privacy in virtual meetings are just two examples of drawbacks to remote work that increase the risk of workplace harassment — but employers can adapt their existing anti-harassment policies to better suit these circumstances, says Ellen Holloman at Cadwalader.

  • Worker Accommodations After Justices' Religious Bias Ruling

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    While the U.S. Supreme Court's recent Groff v. DeJoy decision makes it easier for employees to obtain religious accommodations under Title VII, it also guarantees more litigation over what counts as a substantial hardship for businesses, as lower courts will have to interpret the exact contours of the new standard, says Caroline Corbin at the University of Miami School of Law.