Georgia

  • July 09, 2024

    Ousted Fla. Atty Pushes 11th Circ. To Speed Up Review

    Suspended Florida prosecutor Andrew Warren is once again asking the Eleventh Circuit to expedite a mandate to a lower court to reconsider his case against Gov. Ron DeSantis, arguing that a single judge has stopped it from moving forward for nearly six months.

  • July 09, 2024

    DOL Says It Can Regulate Foreign Farmworkers' Wages

    The U.S. Department of Labor has argued that it has had the authority to regulate wages for foreign H-2A farmworkers for about 40 years, telling a Georgia federal court that 17 Republican attorneys general and two entities cannot halt a rule that just went into effect.

  • July 09, 2024

    BP Unit Slams 'Farfetched' $300M Franchise Termination Suit

    The trio of companies that sued a BP subsidiary for terminating their truck stop franchise agreement have no claim to make, the BP unit has told an Ohio federal court, arguing that by their own admission the companies failed to hold up their end of the agreement at issue.

  • July 08, 2024

    Giuliani's Creditors Call Ch. 7 Conversion Bid A 'Delay Game'

    Rudy Giuliani's unsecured creditors in his Chapter 11 case on Monday slammed the former New York City mayor's bid in New York bankruptcy court to convert the proceedings to a liquidation, saying the move is just another part of his "delay game" to avoid discovery and "responsibility for his malfeasance."

  • July 08, 2024

    11th Circ. Reverses Halt On Ga. Election Spending Probe

    The Eleventh Circuit on Monday threw out a district court ruling blocking Georgia officials from enforcing a state campaign finance law against two nonprofits founded by Stacey Abrams that challenged the law's constitutionality, holding that the lower federal court should have abstained in light of a state proceeding.

  • July 08, 2024

    Ex-Ga. Insurance Chief Wants Lighter Term In Kickback Case

    Former Georgia Insurance Commissioner John Oxendine has objected to the government's recommendation that he serve 44 months in prison and pay a $700,000 fine for his role in a multimillion-dollar medical testing kickback scheme, arguing that he is deserving of a lesser sentence.

  • July 08, 2024

    Ga. County Won't 'Sit On Its Hindquarters' In Battery Fire Fight

    A Georgia county suing a battery manufacturer for a massive fire allegedly sparked by the illegal dumping of lithium-ion cells urged a Georgia federal judge Friday to spike the company's "absurd" bid to dismiss the suit, calling the effort "premature and meritless."

  • July 08, 2024

    11th Circ. Revives Fla. Worker's Retaliation Claim

    The Eleventh Circuit partially revived a retaliation suit brought by a Florida construction worker who claims he was harassed for being Cuban and unable to speak English and threatened and assaulted after reporting the behavior, before being fired by a company that said it found him sleeping on the job.

  • July 08, 2024

    Trump Allies Push For Fani Willis DQ In Election Case

    A pro-Donald Trump think tank has thrown its support behind the former president's bid at the Georgia Court of Appeals to have a trial court's decision reversed and Fulton County District Attorney Fani Willis disqualified from prosecuting Trump and 18 co-defendants over interference in the 2020 election.

  • July 08, 2024

    Amazon Must Face Podcast Defamation Suit, ICE Doc Says

    A former physician at a Georgia immigration facility who says he was falsely accused of performing forced hysterectomies on detainees has urged a federal judge not to let Amazon and podcast publisher Wondery distance themselves from a podcast episode that dubbed him "The Uterus Collector."

  • July 05, 2024

    Real Estate Recap: Post-Chevron, Lawyer Leaps, Q&A Recap

    Catch up on this past week's key developments by state from Law360 Real Estate Authority — including policy areas to watch in the wake of the U.S. Supreme Court's paradigm-shifting Chevron ruling, recent real estate lawyer moves and some insightful conversations with real estate lawyers you may have missed.

  • July 05, 2024

    11th Circ. Won't Touch $9.7M College Hurricane Coverage Win

    The Eleventh Circuit ruled Friday that a district court unlawfully certified a partial judgment in favor of The Baptist College of Florida for review in a $13 million insurance coverage dispute for hurricane damage costs.

  • July 05, 2024

    How Reshaped Circuit Courts Are Faring At The High Court

    Seminal rulings from the U.S. Supreme Court's latest term will reshape many facets of American society in the coming years. Already, however, the rulings offer glimpses of how the justices view specific circuit courts, which have themselves been reshaped by an abundance of new judges.

  • July 05, 2024

    Breaking Down The Vote: The High Court Term In Review

    The U.S. Supreme Court's lethargic pace of decision-making this term left the justices to issue a slew of highly anticipated and controversial rulings during the term's final week — rulings that put the court's ideological divisions on vivid display. Here, Law360 takes a data dive into the numbers behind this court term.

  • July 05, 2024

    High Court Flexes Muscle To Limit Administrative State

    The U.S. Supreme Court's dismantling of a 40-year-old judicial deference doctrine, coupled with rulings stripping federal agencies of certain enforcement powers and exposing them to additional litigation, has established the October 2023 term as likely the most consequential in administrative law history.

  • July 05, 2024

    The Sharpest Dissents From The Supreme Court Term

    The U.S. Supreme Court's session ended with a series of blockbuster cases that granted the president broad immunity, changed federal gun policy and kneecapped administrative agencies. And many of the biggest decisions fell along partisan lines.

  • July 05, 2024

    5 Moments That Shaped The Supreme Court's Jan. 6 Decision

    When the high court limited the scope of a federal obstruction statute used to charge hundreds of rioters who stormed the Capitol, the justices did not vote along ideological lines. In a year marked by 6-3 splits, what accounts for the departure? Here are some moments from oral arguments that may have swayed the justices.

  • July 05, 2024

    The Funniest Moments Of The Supreme Court's Term

    In a U.S. Supreme Court term teeming with serious showdowns, the august air at oral arguments filled with laughter after an attorney mentioned her plastic surgeon and a justice seemed to diss his colleagues, to cite just two of the term's mirthful moments. Here, we look at the funniest moments of the term.

  • July 05, 2024

    11th Circ. Affirms Wells Fargo's Win Over Bitcoin Fraud Suit

    The Eleventh Circuit ruled Friday that a Georgia federal judge correctly tossed a digital trading firm's negligence claims against Wells Fargo over the bank's role in an alleged bitcoin fraud perpetrated through Wells Fargo-held accounts, saying the company failed to show the bank owed noncustomers a duty of care.

  • July 05, 2024

    Justices Told Revoked Visa Petition Is Reviewable

    A woman whose visa petition for her Palestinian husband was revoked two years after being approved urged the U.S. Supreme Court to rule that courts can review secondary decisions, saying that lower courts' refusal to do so creates an irrational system in which only initial decisions can be reviewed.

  • July 05, 2024

    Ga. Elections Office Wants Out Of Appeals Seat Challenge

    An elections office in Fulton County, Georgia's elections department asked a judge this week to be let out of a lawsuit alleging that the winner of a recent state appeals court election lied about his residency and is ineligible for the office, arguing that the suit "fails to make even a single allegation of misconduct, fraud or irregularity."

  • July 05, 2024

    Tech Co. Wants To Undo $535K Retaliation Verdict

    A technology company on Wednesday asked a Georgia federal judge to overturn a jury's decision to award a Black worker $535,000 in damages after finding he was fired in retaliation for complaining that his supervisor discriminated against him and that he was denied a raise because of his race.

  • July 05, 2024

    The Firms That Won Big At The Supreme Court

    This U.S. Supreme Court term featured high-stakes oral arguments on issues including gerrymandering, abortion and federal agency authority, and a hot bench ever more willing to engage in a lengthy back-and-forth with advocates. Here's a look at the law firms that argued the most cases and how they fared.

  • July 05, 2024

    Georgia DAs Say Discipline Panel Already Harming Them

    A legal challenge to Georgia's new prosecutor disciplinary panel should move forward now that the panel has been cleared to begin investigating prosecutors, a bipartisan group of district attorneys told a Georgia state court.

  • July 05, 2024

    PruittHealth Hit With Data Breach Class Action

    Southeastern healthcare provider PruittHealth Inc. was hit with a proposed class action this week alleging that the company's flimsy security protocols led a North Carolina woman and more than 56,000 others to have their personal information stolen in a 2023 data breach.

Expert Analysis

  • Where Anti-Discrimination Law Stands 4 Years After Bostock

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    On the fourth anniversary of the U.S. Supreme Court's landmark Bostock ruling, Evan Parness and Abby Rickeman at Covington take stock of how the decision, which held that Title VII protects employees from discrimination because of their sexual orientation and gender identity, has affected anti-discrimination law at the state and federal levels.

  • Series

    Playing Chess Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    There are many ways that chess skills translate directly into lawyer skills, but for me, the bigger career lessons go beyond the direct parallels — playing chess has shown me the value of seeing gradual improvement in and focusing deep concentration on a nonwork endeavor, says attorney Steven Fink.

  • Litigation Inspiration: Attys Can Be Heroic Like Olympians

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    Although litigation won’t earn anyone an Olympic medal in Paris this summer, it can be worthy of the same lasting honor if attorneys exercise focused restraint — seeking both their clients’ interests and those of the court — instead of merely pursuing every advantage short of sanctionable conduct, says Bennett Rawicki at Hilgers Graben.

  • Lean Into The 'Great Restoration' To Retain Legal Talent

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    As the “great resignation,” in which employees voluntarily left their jobs in droves, has largely dissipated, legal employers should now work toward the idea of a “great restoration,” adopting strategies to effectively hire, onboard and retain top legal talent, says Molly McGrath at Hiring & Empowering Solutions.

  • 9th Circ. Ruling Shows Lies Must Go To Nature Of Bargain

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    The Ninth Circuit’s recent U.S. v. Milheiser decision, vacating six mail fraud convictions, clarifies that the key question in federal fraud cases is not whether lies were told, but what they were told about — thus requiring defense counsel to rethink their strategies, say Charles Kreindler and Krista Landis at Sheppard Mullin.

  • The Uncertain Scope Of The First Financial Fair Access Laws

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    With Florida and Tennessee soon to roll out laws banning financial institutions from making decisions based on customer traits like political affiliation, national financial services providers should consider how broadly worded “fair access” laws from these and other conservative-leaning states may place new obligations on their business operations, say attorneys at Sullivan & Cromwell.

  • Why Jurors Balk At 'I Don't Recall' — And How To Respond

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    Jurors often react negatively to a witness who responds “I don’t remember” because they tend to hold erroneous beliefs about the nature of human memory, but attorneys can adopt a few strategies to mitigate the impact of these biases, say Steve Wood and Ava Hernández at Courtroom Sciences.

  • Series

    Fishing Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Atop the list of ways fishing makes me a better lawyer is the relief it offers from the chronic stress of a demanding caseload, but it has also improved my listening skills and patience, and has served as an exceptional setting for building earnest relationships, says Steven DeGeorge​​​​​​​ at Robinson Bradshaw.

  • A Healthier Legal Industry Starts With Emotional Intelligence

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    The legal profession has long been plagued by high rates of mental health issues, in part due to attorneys’ early training and broader societal stereotypes — but developing one’s emotional intelligence is one way to foster positive change, collectively and individually, says attorney Esperanza Franco.

  • To Make Your Legal Writing Clear, Emulate A Master Chef

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    To deliver clear and effective written advocacy, lawyers should follow the model of a fine dining chef — seasoning a foundation of pure facts with punchy descriptors, spicing it up with analogies, refining the recipe and trimming the fat — thus catering to a sophisticated audience of decision-makers, says Reuben Guttman at Guttman Buschner.

  • EPA Heavy-Duty Vehicle GHG Rules Face Bumpy Road Ahead

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    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's new standards to reduce greenhouse gas emissions for owners and operators of heavy-duty vehicles are facing opposition from both states and the transportation industry, and their arguments will mirror two pending cases challenging the EPA's authority, says Grant Laizer at Adams and Reese.

  • Circuit Judge Writes An Opinion, AI Helps: What Now?

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    Last week's Eleventh Circuit opinion in Snell v. United Specialty Insurance, notable for a concurrence outlining the use of artificial intelligence to evaluate a term's common meaning, is hopefully the first step toward developing a coherent basis for the judiciary's generative AI use, says David Zaslowsky at Baker McKenzie.

  • Class Actions At The Circuit Courts: May Lessons

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    In this month's review of class action appeals, Mitchell Engel at Shook Hardy discusses four notable circuit court decisions on topics from automobile insurance to securities — and provides key takeaways for counsel on issues including circuit-specific ascertainability requirements and how to conduct a Daubert analysis prior to class certification.

  • Perspectives

    Trauma-Informed Legal Approaches For Pro Bono Attorneys

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    As National Trauma Awareness Month ends, pro bono attorneys should nevertheless continue to acknowledge the mental and physical effects of trauma, allowing them to better represent clients, and protect themselves from compassion fatigue and burnout, say Katherine Cronin at Stinson and Katharine Manning at Blackbird.

  • Series

    Playing Music Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My deep and passionate involvement in playing, writing and producing music equipped me with skills — like creativity, improvisation and problem-solving — that contribute to the success of my legal career, says attorney Kenneth Greene.

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